19 Oct

As a widening attack surface and evolving threats mean that organisations continue to breached despite a large security spend, many businesses are now turning to the ‘zero-trust’ security model.

What Is The Zero-Trust Security Model?

The Zero Trust security model, introduced by analyst firm Forrester Research, is an alternative architecture for IT security that doesn’t work on the traditional assumption that the perimeter is the main focus and that the inside of an organization’s network can be trusted. Zero-trust assumes that untrusted actors exist both inside and outside a company network, and that every user access request has to be authorised, using the principle of “never trust, always verify”. In this way, Zero-trust can address lateral threat movement within the network i.e. stopping insider and other threats from spreading once inside.

Breaches

Almost 70% of organisations are getting breached an average of five times a year, with 81% of breaches being simply linked to weak, default or stolen passwords. Once inside networks, attackers can camouflage their attack behind a legitimate identity like a database administrator, can go on to access and decrypt encrypted information, and be harder to spot and stop because of their apparent legitimacy.

According to some security commentators, this shows that identity, and identity-centric security measures are areas that organisations need to focus on, and this is where architecture such as zero-trust can help.

10 Cyber-Attacks Per Week

More businesses are recognising the need for a better approach to all-round security, particularly in an environment where hacking’s on the up. For example, The UK‘s National Cyber Security Centre has just announced that it has stopped 1,600 attacks over the past two years, many by hostile nation states and that there are now 10 such attacks per week. Also, the NCSC’s Active Cyber Defence (ACD) initiative reports removing 138,398 phishing sites hosted in the UK between September 2017 and August 2018.

Four Pillars of Zero-Trust Security

The zero-trust security model is, therefore, believed to be another step forward in the battle against cyber-criminals. The success of the zero-trust security model is based upon four key ‘pillars’, which are:

  1. Verifying users. This involves identity consolidation which can tackle weak / shared password issues (using single sign-on and one-time passwords), de-facto authentication everywhere, and monitoring user behaviour e.g. time and location factors.
  2. Validating devices.
  3. Limiting access of privileged users where possible.
  4. Applying machine learning to all these factors, and using this to step up the authentication processes wherever necessary. Machine learning also removes the need for manual intervention.

Benefits

Those who have implemented zero-trust security have reported many benefits. These include cost savings due to gains in incident response efficiencies and technology consolidation, and greater confidence in supporting users on mobile devices and rolling out new partner and customer experiences.

Challenge

One main challenge to the growth of the adoption of zero-trust security measures is the mistaken belief that it has to be time-consuming and takes a lot of effort to implement. Security commentators are keen to point out that, in reality, implementing a zero-trust security model is a step-by-step process.

What Does This Mean For Your Business?

It seems that the benefits of the zero-trust model are now becoming widely known by UK businesses and organisations. For example, an IDG study revealed that 71% of security-focused IT decision makers are actively pursuing a zero-trust security model, 10% are currently doing pilots, and around 8% who have implemented it fully.

It’s important to realise that the implementation needn’t be a huge hassle and expense and can be tackled step-by-step, using commercial off-the-shelf technology. This approach to security offers businesses the chance to customise their security for their specific data and assets, and strengthen their infrastructure from the ground up by enabling the identification of vulnerabilities and gaps in their current security models at the root level.

This approach can bring some much-needed benefits, not least of which is a greater feeling of trust and a confidence boost. In terms of more measurable benefits to businesses, a Forrester and Centrify study, for example, has shown that by applying best practices of zero-trust principles, organisations recorded 50% fewer breaches within just two months. These kinds of figures are making this approach to security very attractive to many businesses, particularly those who have fallen victim to costly cyber attacks.